THOUGHTFUL ACTIONS: Discussion from Sunday's Sermon

According to Ephesians 4:11, shepherds are responsible to equip the saints so they can do the work of the ministry. 

·      Why do you think that many Christians think that in order to really minister you need to be ordained or on paid staff at a church?  What passages of Scripture teach differently?

·      Do you find it liberating or intimidating to know that you are supposed to minister to other people in your church family? 

·      What intimidates you about ministering to other people?

·      How does our small group give us an opportunity to truly minister to each other?

·      If the preaching of the word is one of the most important ways God equips you to minister, how can you best prepare yourself to hear the word as it is preached on Sunday mornings?

 

God desires that we not be carried about by new doctrines and teachings that come on the scene (v.14). In other words, we’re supposed to have the same worldview that Jesus and the Apostles had. We’re supposed to believe the same things about God, man, the world, and the Gospel as contained in the Scriptures.

·      Why is this important and how does it make a difference in the process of Christian growth?

·      What are some contemporary challenges to our privilege and responsibility to have the same worldview that Jesus had as revealed in the Scriptures?

 

Quite often, people are burdened to do what they are called and gifted to do.  Paul says it this way in v.16, …joined and held together by every joint with which it is equipped, when each part is working properly… This is how God works.  He makes you into a particular “body part” and then supernaturally gives you the capacity to fill that role properly.

·      If you could minister in any way you wanted to, in what way do you wish you could minister to people?  In what ways are you burdened to serve the other members of your church family?

·      What can you do to prepare yourself for that ministry that God has burdened you for?

·      What difference would it make if you thought more about ministering to others than about being ministered to by others?